Graphic: megaphone with text saying Raise your voice for people with MS # Speak up for MS

Ocrelizumab campaign win

We did it! Ocrelizumab has been approved to be available on the NHS for people with early primary progressive MS in England. This is a landmark moment in MS treatment.

Back in 2018, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) approved ocrelizumab for relapsing MS, but then rejected it for early primary progressive MS.

In response to this, we came together in our thousands to call for ocrelizumab to be available on the NHS for people with primary progressive MS. 21,000 of you signed our petition and thousands of emails were sent to MPs.  In May 2019, NICE changed its decision, after an updated submission was made by the pharmaceutical company, Roche. This means ocrelizumab will be available on the NHS in England in a few months' time

For now, this decision only applies to England. The pharmaceutical company who make the drug say there are plans to make ocrelizumab available on the NHS across the UK as soon as possible, and we’ll be continuing to monitor this.

A landmark moment

DMTs are not a cure for MS, but they can slow down damage that builds up over time. There are several DMTs for relapsing MS. But ocrelizumab (drug name Ocrevus) is the first and only one licensed to treat primary progressive MS.

Each year around 650 people are diagnosed with primary progressive MS in the UK. Now, for the first time, there is a treatment that could help.

What's the research?

In medical trials, people with primary progressive MS who took ocrelizumab had 25% less risk of their disability getting worse.

Read more about ocrelizumab research

How we spoke up for progressive MS

After it was rejected in September 2018, over 21,000 of us spoke up together to call for NICE, NHS England and the drug manufacturer Roche to find a deal together. Building on that momentum, we organised an event in the Houses of Parliament in November which was well attended by MPs, the drug manufacturer and most importantly, people with MS.

Since then, Roche and NHS bodies agreed to put forward a new proposal to NICE, which has now been approved. This means ocrelizumab will be available on the NHS for people with early primary progressive MS.

Read more about ocrelizumab

The next research breakthrough is in reach

Your donation will help stop MS.

  • Please enter an amount

    Our minimum donation is £2, please enter a different amount.

£30could process one blood sample, giving researchers crucial information about genes and the immune system.

£50could pay for an hour on a microscope, so scientists can study cells and tissue in greater detail and improve their understanding of the biology of MS.

£100could pay for half an hour of MRI use, so researchers can monitor the success of clinical trials and understand MS in more detail.

Every penny you give really does take us a step closer to stopping MS. Your donation will make a difference.

  • Please enter an amount

    Our minimum donation is £2, please enter a different amount.

£10a month could pay for lab equipment like microscope slides to study the building blocks of MS

£20a month could pay for lab equipment like petri dishes to grow bacteria important for studying genetics

£30a month could process a blood sample to help us understand what causes MS, so we can stop it in its tracks

Your regular donation means we can keep funding world class MS research with confidence. Together we will stop MS.

MS researcher at work in lab, using a pipette